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Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Pipe Freezing Kit Provides Reliable Solution to Inoperable Shut-Off Valves

Plumber Mag - Ken Wysocky

Wisconsin’s Kegonsa Plumbing uses General Pipe Cleaners’ Cold-Shot whenever its technicians run into shut-off valves that don’t work

When technicians at Kegonsa Plumbing run into shut-off valves that don’t work, they keep on working undeterred. Their solution is a Cold-Shot pipe freezing kit from General Pipe Cleaners.

“It’s great to have it as a backup when valves won’t turn off, which happens often enough,” says Lucas Elsing, owner of the Madison, Wisconsin-based company. “It’s very handy in emergencies where you have to get the water turned off.”

Elsing recalls one condominium remodeling job that required changing out a shower valve. It was a simple enough job — except that there were no shut-off valves for the hot- and cold-water lines.

“So we used the Cold-Shot to freeze the hot and cold lines, then cut out a section of pipe on each line to install the valves,” he says. “The alternative was to turn off the water to the building and drain the whole system, which would’ve taken hours, not to mention required a lot of coordination with upset residents. The Cold-Shot allowed us to work without being a nuisance to anyone else.” 

The unit essentially uses liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) to form dry ice that freezes water at a temperature of -110 degrees. That’s cold enough to form an ice plug that can withstand 7,000 psi, yet it won’t burst the pipe. 

“It’s great to have it as a backup when valves won’t turn off, which happens often enough,” says Lucas Elsing, owner of the Madison, Wisconsin-based company. “It’s very handy in emergencies where you have to get the water turned off.”

Elsing recalls one condominium remodeling job that required changing out a shower valve. It was a simple enough job — except that there were no shut-off valves for the hot- and cold-water lines.

“So we used the Cold-Shot to freeze the hot and cold lines, then cut out a section of pipe on each line to install the valves,” he says. “The alternative was to turn off the water to the building and drain the whole system, which would’ve taken hours, not to mention required a lot of coordination with upset residents. The Cold-Shot allowed us to work without being a nuisance to anyone else.” 

The unit essentially uses liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) to form dry ice that freezes water at a temperature of -110 degrees. That’s cold enough to form an ice plug that can withstand 7,000 psi, yet it won’t burst the pipe. 

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